BAV Manuscripts By Fond

The digitized manuscripts of the Vatican Library, organized by fond. Fond is a term for the subcollections by which the library is organized. Some, such as the Rossiani, are from collections donated to, or bought by, the library. Others, such as the Archivio del Capitolo di S. Pietro are from smaller libraries within the overall historical Papal organization. Finally there are open collections, such as the Vaticani, which are still growing with new additions. These are further subdivided into language fonds, such as Vaticani Latini.

The archives of the chapter of St. Peters, which trace their origins to a privilege granted in 1053 by Pope Leo XI. It was transferred to the BAV in 1940 by Pope Pius XII, according to the wishes of the recently deceased Pius XI. Of the collection, some items relate to the business of the Chapter, including mutliple rent and property registers, accounting documents, etc. There are also a number of liturgical manuscripts for the use of the Chapter, including a series of lavish 16th C Antiphonals and manuscripts relating to the history of the city of Rome and St. Peters in particular. Unusually, this vast majority of these MSS have excellent metadata in the online catalogue. Sadly due to technical issues this site does not have good tracking data for when these were digitized, the bulk of them can be seen in a two week stretch in 2019, week 32 and week 33 There are currently 470 manuscripts digitized out of a total of 494 signatures. Sources Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. pp. 333-336 http://www.mss.vatlib.it/arch_gui/console?service=detail&id=1
Random Manuscript Image from the Arch.Cap.S.Pietro fond

Contains 630 autographs of 608 people, sorted alphabetically in 29 albums, of which only 2 have been digitized, and these only from microfilm. These represent important people, both Catholic and non-Catholic who were important in the intellectual and spiritual realms of the 18th-20th C and were given to pope Paul VI on Sept. 26, 1977, his 80th birthday. Sources Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. pp. 469-470

The Barberini collection was started by Maffeo Barberini (Pope Urban VIII) and his Cardinal nephew Francis in the mid 17th Century. At its peak, the collection held roughly 10,000 manuscripts and 50,000 printed books. After the extinction of the Barberini-Colonna family at the end of the 19th C, the collection was sold to the Vatican in September 1902. The Greek collection consists of two sections, Barb.gr.1-281, which are primarily secular works, and Barb.gr.282-590 which are religious in nature. The last 8 shelfmarks come from other parts of the collection and were shifted to the Greek fond after its acquisition by the Vatican. The origins of much of the collection are not well understood, but are likely documented in the rich collection of the Barberini Archives, also held by the Vatican. There are 370 manuscripts of the 594 remaining of the original 598 signatures. Numbers 557-560 were transfered into Barb.or as 161-164. The image to the right is Allegory of Divine Providence and Barberini Power, by Pietro Cortona, from the Palazzo Barberini in Rome. (source) Sources Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. pp. 340-344 Giblin, Cathaldus. "Vatican Library: MSS Barberini Latini: A Guide to the Material of Irish Interest on Microfilm in the National Library, Dublin." Archivium Hibernicum 18 (1955): 67-144. Accessed March 17, 2020. doi:10.2307/25487306.
Header Image from the Barb.gr fond

The Latin section of the Barberini collection is the largest, with 11,072 signatures, representing 11,062 items and about another 250 objects without proper signatures. Of these 920 have been digitized so far. The collection is the largest closed fond of the Vatican, and the second largest collection overall, with only Vat.lat being larger. It was assembled by Maffeo Barberini, Pope Urban VIII, but also other members of his family, in particular by his cardinal nephew Francesco, but also Cardinal Antonio Sr, the uncle of the pope and a Capuchin Monk, and Antonio Jr, Francesco's brother. The fond can roughly be devided into two parts, the first 5,000 volumes being a mix of antiquities, historical books and literature, and the remaining 6,000 volumes consisting of correspondence and other documents relating to Francesco's diplomatic and other activities for the Holy See. Of particular note are Acts of the Consistory, Barb.lat.2867-2933, documents relating to the history of the Index, Barb.lat.3146-3151, and more than 100 volumes related to the Council of Trent, Barb.lat.794-897. Sources Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. pp.344-347
Random Manuscript Image from the Barb.lat fond

165 signatures. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. pp. 348-351
Random Manuscript Image from the Barb.or fond

The families Boncompagni and Ludovisi were joined in with the marriage of Duke Gregorio I Boncompagni and princess of Piombino, Olimpia Ippolita Ludovisi in 1681 and their archives and libraries were combined. These collections predate the union, however, with sections of the archive dating to the 14th C. Both families originate in Bologna, the Boncompagni moving to Rome in the late 16th C with Ugo rising through the Curia to become Pope Gregory XIII in 1572. The Ludovisi moved to Rome in the 17th C, Alessandro leaving again in 1612 to become Archbishop of Bologna, and returning in 1621 as Pope Gregory XV. After negotiations, Prince Francesco Bongompagni Ludovisi donated the archives and libraries to the Vatican in August 1947, though the actual physcial transit lasted until 1952. The archives and library were seperated to the BAV and the Archivo Apostoli, though the ctiteria are unclear. Currently 23 manuscripts have been digitized out of the 911 manuscripts in the collection. These are spread across 919 shelfmarks, the disposition of the remaining 8 manuscripts is unknown. Sources Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. pp. 352-354 http://www.archivioapostolicovaticano.va/content/aav/en/attivita/ricerca-e-conservazione/progetti/inventariazione/archivio-boncompagni-ludovisi.html
Random Manuscript Image from the Bonc fond

Currently there are 40 of the 278 signatures in the collection digitized. The Arabic collection is one of the larger non-Latin collections within the Borgiani, second only to the Chinese in terms of size. It has particular strengths in Arab-Christian works, including two particularly old copies of the Gospel in Arabic: Borg.ar.71 from the 11th-12th C and Borg.ar.95 from the 9th C. F.60v from the later one can be seen to the right. In the 17th C the collection grew through acquisitions from the personal collection of Card. Camillo Massimo (1620- 1677) and also from the closing of the Maronite College in Ravenna in 1665. There is an early catalogue in cards of the collection in Vat.lat.13206, ff. 300r-343v, of Borg.ar.1-29, 31-41, 100, 213, written by Francesco Mari (1873-1934). Furthermore Borg.lat.767, ff. 117r- 124r, has a handwritten topographical inventory of the Arabic codices of the Museo Borgiano di Propaganda. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. pp. 360-361
Header Image from the Borg.ar fond

Currently there are 77 of the 88 signatures in the collection digitized. Only three of these seem to come from Borgia's private collection, # 54, 60 and 61. Other volumes were donated across the 17th and 18th C, with the some of the latest donations, Borg.arm.68, 70, 73 and 85, coming in 1893, from Joseph (Yovsêp‘) Ferahian, bishop of Diarbekir (Diyarbakìr). To the right is a little marginal Mary Magdalene from f.44v of Borg.arm.8, a 17th C hymnal Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. p. 362
Header Image from the Borg.arm fond

Currently there are 10 nautical maps of the 13 maps in the collection. Although the numbering goes up to XVI, according to a note from José Ruysschaert numbers XII, XIV and XV never reached the library. In the inventory preserved in Borg.lat.767, on ff. 253r-254r, the full sixteen are listed. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. pp. 362-363
Random Manuscript Image from the Borg.Carte.naut fond

Currently there are 37 of the 538 signatures in the collection digitized. It is the largest of the foreign (non-Latin) language collections and reflects Stefano Borgia's interest in sending missionaries to China. The bulk of the books are printed, and two are, actually, in Japanese, Borg.cin.501, 520. The collection of Antonio Montucci (†1829) was acquired by the Congregazione de Propaganda Fide, including his hand-engraved printing blocks for Chinese. This subcollection is catalogued in Borg.cin.396. To the right is the first page of Borg.cin.394, a letter from the court of King George III of England to the Chinese emperor. The hand-written transliterations are in the hand of Montucci himself, made when he copied the text while still in London, probably in 1804. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. pp. 363-365
Header Image from the Borg.cin fond

Currently there are 142 of the 137 signatures. This may seem impossible, except that Borg.copt.109 seems to have been a holding shelfmark, containing two volumes and twenty-nine boxes of fragments. Each of those fragments is recorded seperately in the online archive, eg. Borg.copt.109.cass.XXVI.fasc.135 representing the 135th fragment in the 26th box. Sources Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. pp. 365-367
Random Manuscript Image from the Borg.copt fond

Currently there are 18 of the 21 signatures. Only one of these, Borg.ebr.17 was actually part of the collection of Stefano Borgia, the bulk of this fond was donated by Giovanni Pastrizio/Ivan Paštriò (1636-1708), a professor of Hebrew and Greek at the Collegio Urbano di Propaganda Fide. One manuscript, Borg.ebr.14, was donated in the 19th C by a librarian at the College, Paul Louis Bernard Drach, who also supervised an inventory of the entire Borgiani collection, now Borg.lat.767 To the right is the text of "The Song of the Sea" (Ex. 15:1-18) from f.45r of Borg.ebr.17, a 13th C Ashkenazic Torah/Haftorah manuscript, with marginal commentary (Masorah). Here the scribe has stopped the three-column layout in use for the rest of the text and followed the wave-like layout found for this text in Torah scrolls. Sources Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. p. 368 Richler, B., Beit-Arié, M., Pasṭernaḳ, N., Biblioteca apostolica vaticana, & Makhon le-tatslume kitve-ha-yad ha-ʻIvriyim. (2008). Hebrew manuscripts in the Vatican Library: Catalogue. Biblioteca apostolica Vaticana. Studi e Testi 438
Header Image from the Borg.ebr fond

One single object, a copy of an ancient Egyptian papyrus at the Borgiano Museum. dated to 1920. The source of the copy is unknown Sources Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. pp. 368-369
Random Manuscript Image from the Borg.eg fond

Currently there are 6 of the 37 signatures in the collection digitized. The genesis of the collection came from the Ospizio di S. Stefano dei Mori/S. Stefano degli Abissini in Rome, through ownership by the Chapter of the Vatican in 1729 to the Propaganda Fide in 1759. These manuscripts are Borg.et.2, 3, 28, 29, 31, 36, 37. Manuscripts Borg.et.22-27 came from Stefano Borgia's collection and Borg.et.35 was his personal donation while still Secretary. Sources Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. pp. 369-370
Random Manuscript Image from the Borg.et fond

Currently there are none of the fourteen manuscripts in the collection digitized. Of these only 2, Borg.georg 1 and 4, came from Stefano Borgia. There is one additional shelfmark, Borg.georg.3, which was a Bible printed in St. Petersburg. This was transferred to the printed works collection to become S. Scritt. I georg. 1 (3) Cons. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. pp. 370-371

Currently there are 8 of the 27 Signatures in the collection digitized. Of these ten manuscripts were part of the collection of Stefano Borgia, Borg.gr.6,7,9,10,11,12,18,19,21,22 and the rest were later acquisitions. The final codex entered the collection as a donation to Pope Pius VII from Maximos III Mazlum, Melkite Archbishop of Abydos, Mira and eventual Patriarch of Antioch. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. p. 371
Random Manuscript Image from the Borg.gr fond

Currently there are 6 of the 23 signatures in the collection digitized. Contains elements from the original Illyrici and Rutheni categories Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. pp. 371-372
Random Manuscript Image from the Borg.ill fond

Currently there are 70 of the 71 items in the collection digitized. There are 74 shefmarks, but Items 15, 17 and 24 were transfered to become Borg.tonch 23, 41 and 24. This collection contains an assortment of languages from southern and eastern Asia, including Burmese, Cambodian, Hindi, Malayalam, Nepalese, Pali, Sanskrit, Thaii, Tamil, Tibetan, and Urdu. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. pp. 372-375
Random Manuscript Image from the Borg.ind fond

Two signatures. The first, Borg.irl.1 was given to Stefano Borgia on Jan. 12, 1802 by John Connolly, long-time prior of the Irish Dominicans of S. Clemente in Rome and, after 1814, bishop of New York. Nothing is known of the provinance of the other manuscript. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. p. 375

Only one manuscript, given to Stefano Borgia by the Danish scholar Jakob Georg Christian Adler. A 1788 letter from Adler to Borgia describing the manuscript is preserved in Borg.lat.895, ff.20r-v Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. p. 375
Random Manuscript Image from the Borg.isl fond

Currently there are 82 of the 909 items in the collection digitized. The shelfmarks go to 910, including the former Borg.lat.5 which was tranfered into the Arabic fond to become Borg.ar.276. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. pp. 376-377
Random Manuscript Image from the Borg.lat fond

This fond only contains 2 signatures. The first is a ritual text on buckskin in Nahua that was studied at the end of the 18th C by José Lino Fábrega, a former Jesuit missionary to Latin America who had returned to Rome. Due to the death of Stefano Borgia, it was not published until 1891. The second volume is a copy of the Cospiano Codex (Bologna, Biblioteca Universitaria, ms. 4093). In the original Borgia museum there was a third volume, now Borg.lat.763 which is a text describing Mexican fruits. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. pp. 377-378
Random Manuscript Image from the Borg.mess fond

Currently there are 7 of the 23 items in the collection digitized. There are 25 signatures but numbers 1 and 22 were transferred to the Borg.turc fond to become # 82 and 83. Interesting manuscripts in the collection include a pair of Persian Gospels in Borg.pers.18,19 and Borg.pers.15, a Latin-Persian dictionary prepared for printing in the middle of the 17th century by the Discalced Carmelite Ignatius of Jesus (1596-1667), but never actually printed. The start of the A section of this manuscript, f.8r, can be seen to the right. The three columns consist of the source word in Latin on the left, the translation into Persian on the right, and a transliteration of that, in the middle. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. pp. 378-379
Header Image from the Borg.pers fond

Both of the items in the collection have been digitized. They are, in fact, two copies of the same text, the Actus Fidei, Spei, Charitatis, translated into Thai on the orders of Stefano Borgia. The second codex is an updated translation sent back to Rome from the Apostolic Vicar in Bangkok, Olivier Simon Le Bon (1710-1780) Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. p. 380
Random Manuscript Image from the Borg.siam fond

Currently there are 44 of the 178 items in the collection digitized. The shelfmarks count to 181, including the following volumes that were transferred away, Borg.sir.66 became Borg.ar.275, Borg.sir.140 became Borg.copt.135 and Borg.sir.140 became Borg.et.35. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. pp. 380-382
Random Manuscript Image from the Borg.sir fond

Currently there are 41 of the 41 volumes in the collection digitized. Volumes 1-21 and 24 came from the Vietnamese Jesuit Felippe do Rosario (nee Philipé Binh, 1759-1832). Work is ongoing to catalogue these in English Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. pp. 382-383
Random Manuscript Image from the Borg.tonch fond

Currently there are 10 of the 83 volumes in the collection digitized. The shelfmarks count 85, as Borg.turc.11 became Borg.pers.25 and Borg.turc.71 was split into Borg.ar.17 and Borg.lat.765. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. pp. 383-384
Random Manuscript Image from the Borg.turc fond

The familial collection of the Borghese family, with the addition of parts of the Pontifical library at Avignon. Though the library in Avignon had over 2000 volumes, not all of these returned with Benedict XIII. The remining volumes were slowly dispersed and the final 329 were given by Pope Paul V to Scipio Caffarelli Borghese, Cardinal Legate to Avignon. It was purchased by the Vatican in 1891. The image to the right is from the title page of a copy of Aristotle's Logica Nova, Borgh.130 f.1r. Within the initial 'P' of "Primum opertet" the author is shown teaching. Currently there are 388 of the 386 items digitized, though the shelfmarks count 390 items. The last items in the Fond are catalogues of the collection made between the 17th and 19th C, and were only transfered into it later. These are shelfmarks 377-379, 382- 386, 388-390. Sources Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. pp. 354-356
Random Manuscript Image from the Borgh fond

Of the 1293 signatures in the fond, only 1287 items are still held, and of these 53 have been digitized. This collection is one of the only two in the Vatican that exclusively contains music, the other being Vat.mus. It was the library of the Cappella Giulia, officially called Reverend Musical Chapel Julia of the Sacrosanct Papal Basilica of Saint Peter in the Vatican. This is the choir that sings all the Liturgy at St. Peters when the pope is not in attendance. The collection spans the 16th through the 20th C, and the majority of the books are printed. The collection was transferred to the Vatican libraries in 1941, despite the strenuous objection of the then Master of the Chapel, Ernesto Boezi. At the moment, most of the digitized copies are simply scans of microfilm, though a few are in color including the beautiful Medici Chansonnier, Capp.Giulia.XIII.27. To the right is the first page of music, f.7v Sources Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. pp. 384-388
Header Image from the Capp.Giulia fond

709 signatures, only 708 elements. Of these 546 are musical works (402 are true manuscripts and 144, broken up into 206 signatures, are printed), an additional 101 items are archival materials, and the remaining are several catalogues. Sources Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. pp. 393-395
Random Manuscript Image from the Capp.Sist fond

299 signatures, Tracks the fines levied by the Puntatori-Segretari of the Collegio della Cappella Pontifica from 1535-1897 Sources Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. pp. 396-397

Nearly all of the Capponiani collection has been digitized, though a few volumes are still only from microfilm. The collection was received by the Vatican in two pieces, the first segment was bequeathed in 1746, at the death of Alessandro Gregorio Capponi, and was catalogued at the end of the 19th C by Giuseppe Cozzo1, which is now freely available. The second part was given by Capponi to his sister, Maria Anna Capponi who was married to the Count Antonio Cardelli. It was passed to their son Francesco Maria Cardelli, and stayed in the Cardelli family until 1958, when it was bought by the Vatican from Carlo Cardelli. Upon recipt it was appended to the existing Capponiani collection, beginning with codex 287. At that time it was catalogued, and the typescript of that catalogue was added to the collection as Cappon.3182. Notes Cozzo, G. S. (1897). I codici Capponiani della Vaticana. Tipografia Vaticana. Google Books, Internet Archive or Hathi Trust. M. H. Laurent. Supplemento al Catalogo "I codici Capponiani della Biblioteca Vaticana" descritti da Giuseppe Salvo Cozzo" Capponiani 287-317 (1958) Cappon.318. 318 signatures covering 313 objects. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. pp. 397-400
Random Manuscript Image from the Cappon fond

Con suo fratello Antoine (1810-1897), il francese Arnauld d’Abbadie (1815-1893) esplorò l’Etiopia fra il 1838 e il 1850. Del suo viaggio egli scrisse un resoconto, del quale fu pubblicato un solo volume (Paris 1868) durante la sua vita e i cui manoscritti furono ceduti nel 1942 da un’erede al cappuccino Alberto Rincón-Gallardo, che li offrì in seguito alla Santa Sede. Essi pervennero alla Biblioteca Vaticana nel 1966 (19 contenitori). Il testo è stato pubblicato da Jeanne-Marie Allier nella collana «Studi e testi» Sources Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. p.332

79 signatures Sources Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. pp. 535-536
Random Manuscript Image from the Carte.Stefani fond

332 signatures for 329 elements. Numbers 21 and 88 never existed and in 1987 184 and 271 were determined to be part of the same manuscript and combined into 184 pt.A and pt.B Sources Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. pp. 400-402
Random Manuscript Image from the Cerulli.et fond

1055 signatures Sources Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. pp. 402-403
Random Manuscript Image from the Cerulli.pers fond

3636 signatures, 3626 elements. This part of the Biblioteca Chigiana coveres Latin, Greek, Slavic and Asian manuscripts. Sources Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. pp. 403-409
Random Manuscript Image from the Chig fond

301 signatures but only 281 manuscripts. Sources Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. pp. 409-410
Random Manuscript Image from the Comb fond

22 signatures, part of a larger collection primarily of printed books whose 7 incunabla and 72 Aldine volumes are shelved in Stampati De Marinis. pp. 412-413
Random Manuscript Image from the De.Marinis fond

1039 signatures, but only 1038 manuscripts in the collection, which was formed from two donations, the first 22 volumes in 1890 and the remainder in 1926. The printed manuscripts are held in _Stampati Ferrajoli. pp. 419-420.
Random Manuscript Image from the Ferr fond

This is a collection of bindings removed from manuscripts held in other collections, there are currently 47 digitized of the 626 elements in the collection. Most of these were removed from their original sources, both manuscript and printed, during rebinding and restoration work conducted under the pontificate of Leo XIII (1878-1903). Where the original manuscript is known, it is made part of the binding shelfmark, eg. Legat.Pal.lat.930 was the originally a binding for Pal.lat.930, the "Older Worms Letter Collection". Sources Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. pp. 433-434
Random Manuscript Image from the Legat fond

55 signatures but only 50 items. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. pp. 444-446
Random Manuscript Image from the Neofiti fond

475 signatures, but only 473 items, of these only the first 396 were part of the Ottoboni collection proper, the remainder added after its arrival at the Vatican. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. pp. 450-453
Random Manuscript Image from the Ott.gr fond

3,400 signatures, only 3,379 items. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. pp. 453-455
Random Manuscript Image from the Ott.lat fond

40 signatures. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. p. 499
Random Manuscript Image from the P.I.O fond

This collection of 102 manuscripts, of which 1 are digitized, was formed by Abbe Étienne Pagès in the early 19th Century. Shortly before his death in 1841 the collection was sold at a substantial discount to the Marists in Lyon in order that it might stay intact, he had some 50 nephews who might wish to convert their inheritance into cash. It was transfered to the Marist residence in Rome in 1902 to support students at the Roman universities. Sources Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. pp. 455-457

432 signatures, only 398 elements. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. pp. 463-266
Random Manuscript Image from the Pal.gr fond

Currently there are 1827 manuscripts of the 2,006 codices in the collection. There are an additional 25 shelfmarks that reference former items Catalogues Medical manuscripts, in the range Pal.lat.1079-1339 - Schuba, Ludwig. Die medizinischen Handschriften der Codices Palatini Latini in der Vatikanischen Bibliothek. Reichert, 1981. Online Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. pp. 466-469
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15 items in the collection. pp. 470-471
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A single member fond, Pap.borg.dem.1 came to the Vatican Library in 1902 with the rest of the Borgiani. p. 471

A single item collection, this was formerly Bodmer XIV-XV, the earliest fragment of the Gospel of Luke and the Lords Prayer. It was sold in 2006 to Frank Hanna III, who later donated it to the Vatican.
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11 signatures, originally part of the collection of the Vatican Museum p. 472
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A single element, Pap.vat.dem.1 is a contract for a loan of wheat from 108 BCE. It was transfered to the Library from the Vatican Museum in 1904, along with the other Papiri Vaticani items. pp. 473-474

107 signatures. pp. 474-476

27 signatures pp. 476-478
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4,688 signatures. This collection contains manuscripts in Latin, French, and Italian, and five in Greek (Patteta.1 - Patteta.5). pp. 481-483
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233 signatures. pp. 499-500

109 signatures. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. pp. 507-509
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55 signatures but only 54 volumes. The item once known as Reg.gr.Pio.II.19 was transfered back to it's original shelfmark of Pal.gr.193. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. pp. 509-510

There are 1951 manuscripts of the 2,113 currently digitized. An additional 10 catalogue items are no longer part of the collection. The Regensi collection originated with the personal library of Queen Christiana of Sweden, originally a Lutheran, she converted to Catholicism in 1652, at the age of 26. After abdicating the throne, she travelled Europe and eventually settled in Rome in 1655. When she died in 1689, her library was bought by Pietro Ottoboni, the future Pope Alexander VIII. His library was eventually putchased by the Vatican in the mid 18th C, and it was at that point that the Reg.Lat. collection joined the Bibliotheca. Catalogues In the early 20th C, Andreas Wilmart catalogued the first 500 codices in a two volume set, Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. Codices reginenses latini. in Bibliotheca vaticana, 1937. Digital Copies are now avaliable online, Vol. 1, 1-250, Vol 2, 251-500. All of the collection that was owned by the BAV in 1751 is listed in the inventory of D. Teoli, now shelved as Salacons.Mss.Rosso.385 and available online. Sources Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. pp. 510-512
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There are currently 836 manuscripts digitized from the collection of 1,216 items across 1,218 shelfmarks. The collection was donated around the time of WWI by Francesco De Rossi after having been built up in Rome from the middle of the 19th C. It was started by Jean-François Rossi, son of the writer Jean-Gérard de Rossi, around the time of his marriage to Luisa Carlotta of Bourbon-Parma in 1838. It consisted of perhaps 1200 manuscripts and 8500 printed works, including 2500 incunables. Approximately 800 of the manuscripts are in Latin, with others in a mix, including Hebrew, Persian, Ethiopic, Coptic, Arabic, French, and Greek. The Latin collection is quite strong in religous codices, with 20 Books of Hours already digitized alongside ~60 liturgical works. One major part of that collection comes from the library of Cardinal Domenico Capranica (1400-1458) Sources Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. pp. 515-520 https://www.persee.fr/docAsPDF/mefr_0223-4874_1930_num_47_1_7203.pdf
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432 signatures. Sources Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. pp. 520-521

Sources Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. pp. 524-527
Random Manuscript Image from the S.Maria.in.Via.Lata fond

Sources Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. pp. 527-530
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776 signatures, 773 items. Sbath.339 was not part of the donation and Sbath.683 and 772 were fragments taken from Sbath.689, and returned to that volume. pp. 530-532
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Marie-Dominique Sire, born in 1827, was a priest of the Society of Priests of Saint Sulpice, dying in 1917. He was involved in the project that eventually lead to the Bull Ineffabilis (of Sept. 8, 1854), proclaiming the Immaculate Conception of Mary to be Dogma. After the proclemation, he started a project to translate the Bull into all "living" languages, and donate the product to the Pope. From this a donation of 84 manuscripts became the Fonds Sire of the BAV, with a further 23 volumes lost. Sire even comissioned a special bookcase for the Sala dell'immacolata to contain the volumes, see image to the right. For far more detail, please see Duval-Arnould, Louis, sac., 1933- "La collectione «Sire» de la Bibliotèque Vaticane", In Miscellanea Bibliothecae Apostolicae Vaticanae IX, 2002. pp. 115-168. There are currently 18 volumes digitized out of the 84 signatures, consisting of 83 volumes and Sire.L.16, which is only a binding. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. pp. 532-535
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59 signatures. pp. 545-549
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165 signatures, only 163 items. pp. 549-550
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1,779 signatures covering 1,772 items. About 70 items are split into multiple volumes. pp. 550-553
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9 signatures. These volumes are in Cyrilic and date primarily from the 17th-19th C. pp. 646-648

2,054 signatures, 2,039 elements. pp. 553-564
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54 signatures pp. 564-568
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116 signatures, only 110 volumes. Of the six missing volumes 51 had been lost by the first curator Gaetano Marini (1800-1808, died 1815), and 31 and 80 are lost. The shelfmark Vat.copt.51 was reassigned in 1937, but once again made vacant by the transfer of that volume to the Coptic Papyri collection, becoming Pap.vat.copt.1. Numbers 112-114 were transfered at the same time, becoming Pap.vat.copt.5-7. pp. 568-573
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723 signatures, 720 volumes. pp. 573-579
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There are currently 133 digitized of a total of approximately 171. As this collection is one of the rare ones that is in active development, with 7 volumes purchased in 2019 alone, the current total is unknown. The fond contains mostly Chinese manuscripts, but also ones from Japan, Vietnam, Mongolia, and Tibet. Sources Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. (2011). Guida ai fondi manoscritti, numismatici, a stampa della Biblioteca vaticana. Biblioteca apostolica vaticana. pp. 579-582
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340 signatures, 339 elements. pp. 582-584
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2,672 signatures, only 2,649 elements. This fond consists of 18 seperate collections grouped together, including books owned by Antonio Carafa and Fulvio Orsini, those of the collection of the Collegio Greco, and many more. pp. 584-615
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3 signatures pp. 615-616
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77 signatures, 74 volumes. This fond contains books from the Indian subcontinent, Indochina and the Indonesian islands. pp. 616-622
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1 signature. This fond was created in 2004 to better organize manuscripts from Indochina. Its lone volume, which was previously Vat.estr.or.14 was a gift to Pope Paul VI in 1973
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15,379 signatures, 15,625 volumes. It can be broken down into several sections: 1. 1-4888 - The oldest part of the collection, added to the library in the 15th and 16th C. 2. 4889-9851 - Newer volumes, bought or donated from the 17th-19th Century, roughly the pontificate of Paul V through Pius IX. 3. 9852-15379 - Current additions. These volumes have been added since roughly the 1870s. After the Resurgamento and the election of Leo XIII, the Library began a more organized approach, including a formal cataloging initiative of the Vat.lat fond, work which is ongoing today, with the catalogue covering Vat.lat.14666-Vat.lat.15203, manuscripts collected 1964-1987, being published in 1989. Reading Room Catalogues Some of the old hand-written catalogues have been microfilmed, and then digitized, and made available. These are in the language and script of the cataloguer and some are easier to read than others 1-344 Salacons.Mss.Rosso.301 (1) 345-607 Salacons.Mss.Rosso.301 (2) 608-1318 Salacons.Mss.Rosso.302 1319-2141 Salacons.Mss.Rosso.303 pp. 623-640
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A single element, described as a Qulasta or collection of liturgical texts, is of unknown source but was probably brought into the library between 1939-1957, due to the binding having the arms of Pius XII. pp. 640-641

678 signatures, 673 elements. pp. 641-643
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179 signatures, 172 elements. pp. 644-646
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4 signatures. pp. 648-649
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663 signatures, 655 elements. pp. 649-654
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73 signatures, only 70 elements pp. 655-658
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446 signatures, 428 elements. Many of the missing signatures were transfered into the Vat.arb and Vat.pers collections. pp. 658-663
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